101: Post #, Unconferences, Blogging, Highway, Ideas

Post # 101

According to my WordPress stats dashboard, this is post number 101 for Events Wrangling.

101Back in April, in the early days of this blog, I wrote the post “100…150…200 Consecutive Days” in which I set a goal of publishing a post on at least 200 consecutive days. Well, I’m halfway to that goal now, and it’s been fun thus far.

When I go on a road trip, four hours seems to last a long time if I’m only going on a five-hour journey. Similarly, if one has a goal of writing 120 consecutive daily posts (or 3 months worth), getting to the point of 101 consecutive posts would seem like a relatively long trudge. On the other hand, the first four hours of an eight-hour trip or four-day trip seem to fly right by. Because of that same mind-altering effect of perspective and expectations, the first 100 posts of this 200-post Journey seem to have flown right past in a flash.

Writing and publishing a post hasn’t seemed overly taxing on most days, although on the days immediately following my bout with food poisoning, it was a struggle to put together more than five or six words that made sense (to the extent that my words ever make sense), and it was even more of a struggle to proofread and publish them in a blog post.

timezonesAlso, in the early days of my Events Wrangling publishing, I didn’t realize that my WordPress account timezone was set five hours ahead. I just assumed WordPress would set the publish time for my blog the same as the clock setting on my laptop, which is generally local time where I am. But one day I noticed that WordPress was showing the same publishing date for posts that were written on two consecutive days. I couldn’t figure out what was going on at first, but then I poked around in my WordPress account and found the timezone off by five hours. That meant when I published a post after 7 PM local time, WordPress would stamp it as having been published after midnight (i.e. the next day). So I was sort of publishing in the future! 🙂 I promptly changed the timezone setting to correct that minor issue.

I’m looking forward to the next hundred posts. There are still hundreds of post topics I’d love to ramble on about, although another one of my goals is to work on writing shorter posts which still feel like they’re worth publishing. It’s challenging to cram all the thoughts about one topic zipping around my neural network into a cohesive story which is short enough that people will take time to read it…

Unconferences 101

unconference 2One of the informal goals for this blog is to be an advocate and resource for participant-driven events such as unconferences. I’m writing a series of posts about unconferences, which began with “Events Wrangling Basics For Unconferences.” There is also a separate page / tab on this blog for Unconference Resources.

[Which reminds me, I need to spend a few hours working on that page to make it more useful and complete…]

The article “How far does the Pokémon brand have to carry Pokémon Go?” examines in detail the value users can add to Pokémon Go and how user-generated value contributes to the success of gaming platforms. In today’s internet-connected world, there are many other examples of users creating tremendous value pikachuor being the driving force behind events and movements. When the users have the permission and tools for making their desires known and helping push their own agenda, that’s a great start towards making something people want.

The best way to get people to support and be involved with an activity is to convince them it was their idea to start with. Well, if an event is participant-driven, it pretty much was their idea to begin with. No convincing needed. From my perspective, “users” will add a tremendous amount of value if only the events wranglers will let them and can figure out how to effectively involve them in the design and execution of events.

If you feel there is significant value in highly-engaged meeting attendees but you don’t want to go to the hardcore unconference end of the event spectrum where every event goer is a participant and there are no attendees, check out Adrian Segar’s Conferences That WORK. His goal is to “create engaging conferences around the learning your attendees really want and need…to build meaningful, mutually beneficial connections between participants.”

Blogging 101

An intentional goal for the Events Wrangling blog is to improve my blogging and writing skills.

blogging fundamentalsYou may be thinking that’s a fitting goal and wishing me luck. And hoping that the improvement happens soon. So do I.

To assist in my quest for Bob’s Better Blogging, I enrolled in the Blogging 101 course, also know as Blogging: Fundamentals, at Automattic’s WordPress.com Blogging University. I learned a few more blogging skills and tips by completing that course, but still have a lonnnnng way to go.

I definitely need to take Blogging 102, or Blogging 201, whichever comes next after 101. In addition to Blogging: Fundamentals, WordPress.com’s Blogging U also offers the courses below, all for the nominal registration fee of zero, which happens to be my target price point.

There are also other free online courses designed to help you become a better blogger, but there are only so many hours in day, and not all of them can be spent blogging.

Highway 101

101 highwayI mentioned road trips at the start of this post. One of the roads I mentioned in “Road Trip Events, Part 2: History” was US Highway 101, which goes from Los Angeles, California, USA, to Tumwater, Washington. Of the 1540 miles of road between those two cities, my favorite miles are the ones that go through Humboldt County, California, especially the ones near Arcata. Redwood trees, almost-mountains, Pacific Ocean, mist-in-the-forest, and, at times, a two-lane road twisting and turning to avoid huge trees that have grown tall over hundreds of years. The best road trips ever happen on 101…

When Automattic hires me as an Events Wrangler, I can guarantee that at some point I’ll be on Highway 101 in Arcata while on my way to or from ahumboldt redwoodsn hours-long online session of events-focused work. I already know of at least six Arcata-area locations with reliable WiFi and an ambiance well-suited to a working Automattician. When not working, I’ll be walking through the redwoods, watching the Pacific Ocean waves roll in, or enjoying the nearby mountains. And maybe I’ll even be helping Humboldt residents organize and put on WordCamp Humboldt for people from Arcata, Eureka, McKinleyville, Fortuna, Petrolia and other far-flung parts of the county.

101 Post Ideas

I’m an engineer, so it seems useful to me to develop a list of future ideas to write about on this blog. I think I had a list of 20 topics when I wrote my first post for Events Wrangling. 100 posts later, I think that list has increased to approximately 101 ideas to write about. Some people have said they can’t think of anything to write about. I’m on the other extreme of “what should I write about?” There are so many things to write about that it’s mildly annoying not to have time to write all the posts that are struggling to be launched into cyberspace.

My Halfway-Post pretty much wrote itself. My mind is already thinking about post #201, wondering what it will say, hoping that the post quality has improved by then, and curious about whether I’ll revise my goal of 200 upward to a more ambitious goal of 365, 500, or even 1,000 consecutive daily posts.

My mind is also wondering if by the time post 200 rolls around I’ll be an Events Wrangler (upper case) working for Automattic… [By the way, they’re hiring!]

*****

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